Intervention. Advocacy. Leadership.

The Bergen County Juvenile Fire Prevention Program - through a partnership with CarePlus - provides fire safety education and intervention to juvenile fire setters and their families.

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Do you know a youth in trouble?

Do you know a youth in trouble?

Here's more information for parents, school officials, and others who are concerned about a troubled youth.
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Recognize dangerous fire setting behavior

Recognize dangerous fire setting behavior

Concerned about a youth who may be using fire inappropriately? Here's what to do about it.
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Become a volunteer fire safety educator

Become a volunteer fire safety educator

Join our team and help Bergen County youth eliminate inappropriate fire setting behavior.
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Contact BCJFPP for more information

Contact BCJFPP for more information

Click here to email or call us if you have any questions about our services.
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In the News: Program teaches Bogota kids the importance of fire safety

As seen on NorthJersey.com – By Cheryl O’Brien – Bogota Bulletin

Bergen County Juvenile Fire Prevention

BERNADETTE MARCINIAK/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER NORTHJERSEY.COM -
Saddle Brook Firefighter Joseph Schilp, who has been a volunteer firefighter for 44 years, spoke to the children about the dangers of fire, smoke and carbon monoxide, fire drills, fire extinguishers, and fire safety tips, among other topics.

Kids’ Safety Awareness Program (KSAP), in partnership with CarePlus New Jersey and the Bergen County Juvenile Fire Prevention Program (BCJFPP), a program offered by CarePlus, sponsored a presentation on fire safety for children and their parents at the Bogota Recreation Center on April 9.

The program was hosted by Jim Moore, director of the Bogota Recreation Center, and introduced by Genesis Liu, founder and president of KSAP.

The guest speaker for the day was Joseph Schilp, fire safety educator for BCJFPP and volunteer firefighter for the township of Saddle Brook. Schilp, who has been a volunteer firefighter for 44 years, spoke to the children about the dangers of fire, smoke and carbon monoxide, fire drills, fire extinguishers, and fire safety tips, among other topics. Schilp also brought in his fireman’s uniform and mask to show the children. Read More

3 Things You Must Know Before Your Smoke Alarm Goes Off

Prevention 1st provides some great articles on fire safety. Their 3 tips on what to do when your smoke alarm goes off can help save lives and reduce panic.

  1. Can you hear it? When you tested that alarm (you do push that “test” button at least twice a year, right?) you may have thought that annoying noise would wake up anyone. But then you were standing only an arm’s reach away. How about now, maybe several floors away? If you use a hearing assistance device during the day, can you still hear the alarm when you take it out at night? Ask someone in your household, or your next visitor, to help you find out – have them push the test button and check whether you can hear it in another room, without assistance.
  2. How are you going to get out? If you were asked that question in daylight when everything was fine, you’d probably say “I’d run out the door, duh.” But getting out of your bedroom when it’s dark can be very different than in the daytime. If you’re awakened by the alarm in the middle of the night, smoke may already be in your room, and you should stay low.
  3. Are the ways out clear of clutter, and well lit? Clutter can be health hazard, as you know if you’ve ever tripped on a toy, shoe, or other object that was left on the floor. Now imagine trying to escape your home in the dark with smoke alarm sounding. Keeping pathways clear and having nightlights, especially around stairs, helps everyone get out quickly and safely.

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Education as an Intervention Strategy in a Youth Firesetting Intervention Program

Original information provided by www.usfa.fema.gov/training/coffee_break/

The majority of cases identified by a youth firesetting intervention program will be classified as “some risk.” Curiosity or experimentation is the prime motive for firesetting as defined in the “some risk” category. “Definite or extreme risk” firesetting situations also require educational intervention. However, sometimes the education will follow a referral for other types of interventions, such as clinical support or juvenile justice.

The goal of fire safety education in a youth firesetting intervention program is to give children and adolescents information to make the right decisions so that future firesetting incidents do not occur.

Educating the child and parents or caregivers is essential for the success of a youth firesetting intervention program. Youth firesetting intervention specialists must not assume that all children, adolescents, and parents or caregivers know the basics about fire safety and fire science. All three groups can be educated to make good decisions through structured, age-appropriate classes. Read More